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The Hatchment of Edwin Humphrey Sandys

by Andrew Parkinson

II came across the Yeo Family and One Name Study Society on the web. My interest is the history of Northbourne in Kent, England and I came across the Yeo family because in 1698 Sir Richard Sandys of Northbourne married Mary, daughter and co-heir of Sir Francis Rolle of Devon (Marydied in 1709). In our church is a hatchment to a later Sandys - Edwin Humphrey Sandys, who seems to have died some time between 1828 and 1833. It is here the Yeo arms are shown (Satchville, Esse, Pyne, Jewe, Brightley), along with another hatchment to his wife Helen, who died in 1833.

(Many thanks to Andrew for sharing these unique photgraphs with us, it's the only time I have seen all the Yeo and quartering families in a shield togethe rand also for all the information on the different coats of arms)

More on the History of the Sandys Family

 
Hatchment of Helen Sandys wife of Edwin Humphrey Sandys
 
Hatchment of Edwin Humphrey Sandys
The Sandys family acquired the majority of their heraldic quartering by marriage into two families - four from the Champneys family and eight from the Rolle family:
The hatchment has 16 arms shown on the shield (the heraldic quartering):

1st - SANDYS - At the top of the shield on the left (dexter) side are the arms of the Sandys family the background is gold (or), across the middle is a red (gules) zigzag (dancetty). There are three cross crosslets and the base of the each cross crosslet comes to a point (fitchy). The crescent is added for difference i.e.added to the coats of arms to distinguish one family from another.

2nd - RAWSON - Background divided, top red (gules), bottom blue (azure) with a silver (argent) tower. The Rawson family were a medieval ancestor of Edwin Humphrey Sandys - William Sandys (c.1439-1496) of Hawkeshead married Margaret, daughter and co-heiress of William Rawson of Yorkshire. She was also cousin and heir to Thomas Rawlinson, Abbott of Furnace Abbey, who was in office 1440-1460.

3rd - CHAMPNEYS - Background divided, left (dexter) silver (argent) and right (sinister) blue (azure) with a rampant lion red (gules) and gold (or) with a black (sable) tongue (langued). Edwin Sandys married Catherine, daughter of Richard (d.1653) and Bridget Champneys of Hall Place, Bexley, Kent. The Champneys were an ancient Norman family, Catherine's great grandfather - Sir John Champneys - was lord mayor of London in 1534 and began building Hall Place around 1537. Her grandfather - Justinian Champneys - was sheriff of Kent in 1582. Her father sold Hall Place and moved to Woolwich. Edwin Sandys, a Parliamentarian colonel, was mortally wounded at the Battle of Powick Bridge, Worcester, on 23rd September 1642.

4th - AVENALL - Background silver (argent) with a red (gules) band (fess) between six red (gules) annulets and in the centre a bezant - a gold coin of Byzantium; when they appear in a coat of arms their colour is not described; a bezant is always gold (or). The Avenall/Avenell family married into the Champneys family, around the early 1200s, when Sir Hugh Champneys married Maud Avenall, the daughter of Sir John Avenall.

5th - TORTES - Background red (gules) a gold (or) griffin rampant, displaying its wings as if about to fly (segreant) with a black (sable) tongue (langued). The Tortes/Torts family married into the Champneys family, around the time of Edward I (reign 1272-1307) when Ralph Champneys married heiress Alma (or Aliva) Tortes of Devon.

6th - BLUNDELL - Background silver (argent) with a red (gules) chevron between three green (vert) eagles with wings expanded and legs spread (displayed). This shield is partly obscured by the Chick shield (escutcheon) in the middle of the coat of arms. The Blundell family married into the Champneys family, when Justinian Champneys married his second wife Theodora Blundell, heiress of John Blundell of Steeple Barton, Oxfordshire. Theodora died on 25 June 1582 and is buried at Bexley. Justinian Champneys was sheriff of Kent in 1582. His first wife, Helen Halle, died in 1565, and he went on to marry a third wife, Anne Eden, who outlived him (he died in 1596, aged 65) and she re-married Sir Philip Paris of Cambridge.

7th - SANDYS - as before, but no crescent - see 1st. This shield is partly obscured by the small shield (escutcheon) in the middle of the coat of arms.

8th - RAWSON - as before - see 2nd.

9th - ROLLE - Background gold (or) with a  blue (azure) zigzag (dancetty) and a bezant on each upper point, between three blue (azure) billets, each with a gold (or) lion rampant. Sir Richard Sandys was created a baronet in 1684, and in 1698 he married Mary, daughter and co-heir of Sir Francis Rolle, of Devon. Mary was buried at Northbourne 5th Oct.1709. Henry Rolle (the third son of George Rolle of Stevenstone) married Margaret Yeo sometime around the mid 1500s.
Margaret was the daughter of Robert Yeo and Mary Yeo (née Fortescue). So Henry Rolle's descendants were able to quarter the arms of the Yeo family, whichi ncluded five more shields, which the Yeo family had aquired by marrying heiresses and co-heiresses, that of: Sacheville, Ashe/Esse, Pyne, Jewe, and Brightley (see below). The Rolle arms also included the arms of the Foote family (see below). So when Richard Sandys, married Mary Rolle in 1698, later Sandys generations were able to add eight shields to their arms.

10th - YEO - Background silver (argent) with a black (sable) chevron between three   black (sable) swans [earlier Yeo arms show them as blue (azure) drakes, but here shown as black swans]. This shield is partly obscured by the Chick shield (escutcheon) in the middle of the coat of arms. Heanton Satchville, near Petrockstowe in North Devon was the ancestral home of the Yeo family. The Yeo family married heiresses and co-heiresses of Sacheville, Ashe/Esse, Pyne, Jewe, and Brightley families; each family adding a new shield into the Yeo coat of arms. The main line of Yeo of Heanton Sachvile running out when Henry Rolle (the third son of George Rolle of Stevenstone) married Margaret Yeo. The Yeo coat of arms was then incorporated into the Rolle family.

11th - SACHEVILLE - Background blue (azure) with three gold (or) crossbows. This shield is partly obscured by the Chick shield (escutcheon) in the middle ofthe coat of arms. Incorporated into the William Yeo's coat of arms in the 1300s.

12th - ASHE/ESSE - Background silver (argent) with two black chevronels. Incorporated into the Yeo coat of arms. William Yeo, who was sheriff of Devon in 1359, married Anne Esse (or Ayshe), an heiress who brought into the Yeo family properties in West Anstey in South Molton.

13th - PYNE - Background red (gules) with an ermine chevron between three gold (or) pineapples or pine-cones. Incorporated into the Yeo coat of arms. Robert Yeo, who was living in 1410, married Joan Pyne (son Robert born c. 1380, see Jewe) the daughter and heir of William Pyne, of Bradwell. She was an heiressand brought into the Yeo family the manor of Bradwylle. Joan's first marriage was to Sir William Brightley. Robert was the grandson of William Yeo (sheriff of Devon in 1359, see Ashe/Esse).


14th - BRIGHTLEY - Background red (gules) with the top (chief) indented and silver (argent). Incorporated into the Yeo coat of arms. The order of the arms suggest this shield was brought in through the Pyne or Jewe family,

15th - JEWE - Background green (vert) with a lion rampant guardant ermine with a red (gules) middle section (debruised by a fess). Incorporated into the Yeo coat of arms. John Yeo (born c. 1380), married Alice Jewe, a co-heiress of William Jewe of Cotley. John was son of Robert Yeo (see Pyne). A stained glass window in St. Petrocks Church, Petrockstowe, Devon, (c. 1450) shows the arms of the Yeo and Jewe families.

16th - FOOTE - Background silver (argent) with a black (sable) chevron and a black (sable) trefoil. The Foote family from Devon married into the Rolle family when Priscilla Foote (born after 1634), daughter of Thomas (c. 1591-1687) and Elizabeth Foote (née Mott),  married Francis Rolle in 1654. The Foote crest is an oak tree.

CHICK - Shield in the middle (in pretence) background silver (argent) with three red (gules) cocks. The small shield in the middle is an escutcheon indicating Edwin Humphrey Sandys's second wife, Helen Sandys, was the heiress of Edward Lord Chick of Westham in Essex, hence the three cocks. A Edward Lord Chick is recorded as captain of the ship Anson on a voyage in 1764-65.[1] It seems the Lord and Chick families intermarried. [2]

Note:
[1] - Edward Lord Chick was only captain for the one voyage in 1764-65, a new captain is listed in 1766. The 657 ton ship was launched in 1764, equiped with a crew of 102/106 and 26/30 guns. In 1773 it was purchased by the East India Company , who changed its name to Asia. In 1776 it was sold to James Mather of London and renamed Look. It was then hired out as a troop transport to the North American colonies. In 1779 it was wrecked in the St Lawrence River. (see East India Company Ships: http://eicships.info/eic/ships/shipdetail.asp?sid=432 ).

[2] - There was a branch of the Lord family in Pennsylvania as Eleanor Lord (bapt. 24 Apr 1752) and died while still a minor  marked the end of the  Pennsylvania branch of the Lord family. Her estate, derived from the  Rambo family, her father - John Lord - inherited an estate from his uncle - Andrew Rambo), and on her death the Lord and Rambo estates were inherited by her father's cousin , Edward Lord Chick. (see The Rambo Family Tree by Beverly Nelson Rambo: http://members.aol.com/RamboBook ). It is possible that Edward Lord Chick's mother was a Lord and his father a Chick!

SANDYS Crest - A griffin displaying its wings as if about to fly (griffin segreant) bottom red (gules) top gold (or) with a red (gules) crescent on the griffin'sshoulder. The crescent is added for difference i.e. added to the coats of arms to distinguish one from another.  The helmet (helm) is of grey steel, in profile, with the visor closed showing him to be a gentleman or esquire. The wreath consists of red (gules) and gold (or) silks wound round each other, and placed on the top of the helmet for the crest to rest upon. The mantling - the flowing drapery forming the scroll-work - is red (gules) silver (argent).

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