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The Keall and Picksley Families of Lincolnshire and Nottingham

 

William Keall & Elizabeth ne Crowford with children, William, George & Elizabeth Harriet



The Keall Family

George Keall (born 1811) and Harriet Elley of Lincolnshire

George Keall , son of John Keall and Elizabeth, was born on 14 Apr 1811 in Sausthorpe, Lincolnshire and died on 31 Dec 1889 at age 78. George married Harriet Elley , daughter of Thomas Elley and Elizabeth Starke . Harriet was born on 28 Aug 1816 in North Thoresby, Lincolnshire and died on 22 Jun 1863 at age 46.

In 1851 George & Harriet were living Hagworthingham, Lincolnshire George was an agricultural labourer and with them were children, Caroline aged 10, Jemima aged 9, Elizabeth aged 8, Sarah aged 6, Henry aged 3 and baby Charles aged 11 months.

By 1871 they had moved to Raithby , Lincolnshire and living with George & Harriet was William, then aged 13 years old and a farm boy. Living just a few doors away was William's future bride, Elizabeth Crowford 's family.

Children from this marriage were:

  • Caroline Keall born on 26 Sep 1840 in Burwell, Lincolnshire and died on 8 Dec 1911 at age 70.
  • Jemima Keall born on 9 Jun 1841 in Setford, Lincolnshire and died on 23 Aug 1900 at age 59.
  • Elizabeth Keall born on 2 Mar 1843 in Setford, Lincolnshire and died on 6 Aug 1861 at age 18.
  • Sarah Keall born in 1845 in Setford, Lincolnshire.
  • Henry Keall born on 14 Dec 1847 in Setford, Lincolnshire and died on 23 Mar 1906 at age 58.
  • Charles Keall born on 17 Apr 1850 in Setford, Lincolnshire.
  • Emma Keall born on 27 May 1853.
  • Hannah Keall born on 9 Apr 1854 and died on 13 Dec 1865 at age 11.
  • William Keall born on 11 May 1857 in Hagworthingham, Lincolnshire and married Elizabeth Crowford

William Keall (born 1857) and Elizabeth Crowford

 

William Keall was born on 11 May 1857 in Hagworthingham, Lincolnshire and died on 7 Feb 1929 at age 71. William married Elizabeth Crowford , daughter of George Crowford and Elizabeth Overton , on 3 June, 1880 in Raithby Nr Spilsby, Lincolnshire. Elizabeth was born on 19 Nov 1855 in Raithby and died on 1 Oct 1929 at age 73.

By 1871 his parent's had moved and William was living with his parents in Raithby , Lincolnshire and was a farmer's boy.

In 1891 William was living in Alford, Lincolnshire and was a railway plate layer, with him was his wife, Elizabeth , daughter Elizabeth Harriett born abt 1889 Tothby Nr Alford, Lincolnshire. son George born abt 1884 Raithby, Lincolnshire and son William born abt 1881 Sutterby, Lincolnshire.

 
William with granddaughter, Kathy around 1918
     
William & Elizabeth with grandson, George around 1916

William Keall was born on 11 May 1857 in Hagworthingham, Lincolnshire and died on 7 Feb 1929 at age 71. William married Elizabeth Crowford , daughter of George Crowford and Elizabeth Overton , on 3 June, 1880 in Raithby Nr Spilsby, Lincolnshire. Elizabeth was born on 19 Nov 1855 in Raithby and died on 1 Oct 1929 at age 73.

By 1871 his parent's had moved and William was living with his parents in Raithby , Lincolnshire and was a farmer's boy.

In 1891 William was living in Alford, Lincolnshire and was a railway plate layer, with him was his wife, Elizabeth , daughter Elizabeth Harriett born abt 1889 Tothby Nr Alford, Lincolnshire. son George born abt 1884 Raithby, Lincolnshire and son William born abt 1881 Sutterby, Lincolnshire.

 
William around 1918
 

 

 

In 1901 the family were still living in Alford and George was a telegraph messenger. These photographs show the relationship William & Elizabeth had with son George and his family.. They were obviously very fond of their grandchildren and the children seem very relaxed with them.

 

Children from this marriage were :

  • William Keall born on 24 Jan 1881 in Sutterby, Lincolnshire and died on 16 Jan 1978 in Canada at age 96. William married Edith Annie Arrand . Their son, William Stewart Keall , was born on 27 Apr 1914 and died in 1988 at age 74. He married Dorothy Arrand . Children from this marriage are Ron Keall and Jerry W Keall . William and Edith emigrated to Canada in 1824. They travelled from Liverpool on the Montcalm and arrived in Montreal on the 14th June. William was a clergyman.
  • George Keall was born on 13 Jul 1883 in Alford, Lincolnshire and died on 27 Mar 1977 in West Bridgeford, Nottingham at age 93. George married Mary Edna Picksley
  • Elizabeth Harriet Keall was born on 19 Jul 1889 in Tothby Nr Alford, Lincolnshire and died on 9 Feb 1966 at age 76.Elizabeth married John William Cheffings (b. 16 Dec 1890, d. 26 Sep 1958). Kitty Cheffings was born on 5 Apr 1916. Kitty married John Peter Cock (b. 1919, d. 4 Dec 2001) and their children are Philip Cock and Tracie Cock . Tracie has two sons, Mark and James

George Keall (born 1881) and Mary Edna Picksley

 
George & Edna around 1912
 

George Keall was born on 13 Jul 1883 in Alford, Lincolnshire and died on 27 Mar 1977 in West Bridgeford, Nottingham at age 93. George married Mary Edna Picksley daughter of William Picksley and Clara Massam , on 6 Mar 1911 in St John The Evangelist, Carrington. Mary was born on 7 Nov 1889 in Normanby, Lincolnshire and died on 13 Sep 1971 in Nottingham, Notts at age 82.

 
 
George on his bike with Connie about 1914

George Keall , late of 3 Hills Road, Woodthorpe. Died 27th March 1977 in a Nursing Home at West Bridgford aged 93 years. Born 13th July 1883 near Lord Tennyson's home near Alford in Lincolnshire. He loved the Lincolnshire countryside and left school to work for a time in a chemist's shop, where the simple remedies concocted and sold made a lasting impression on his young mind.

Then as a young man he gained entry into the Post Office, where he remained for the rest of his working life. Starting as a messenger boy he became a country postman, who with a horse and trap delivered and collected mail in and around villages over one day, staying overnight and then returning by another route, meanwhile stopping to read letters to, and write letter for many of the country folk. His overnight stop was at a small hut in a village called Strubby, and with another young man, he set up a miniature gymnasium where they were able to develop their interests in weight-lifting, boxing and similar activities.

About this time he also became interested in photography, and the family still possess his original 1/2 plate Lancaster box camera which produced incredibly good pictures, even by modern standards.

He met his wife-to-be, who came from north Lincolnshire in one of the villages. She moved to Nottingham and he obtained a transfer and followed her. They were married at St. John the Evangelist, Carrington, on 6th March 1911.

 
The familyaround 1916, George & Edna with children, Philip, Connie and George.
 
After living for a time in Sherwood they moved to 2 Greys Road Woodthorpe, and many years after, built their own house at 3 Hills Road, Woodthorp bringing up their family meanwhile, and spent the rest of their days together there. They were devoted to each other and their children.

There were five children all together, three sons and two daughters, and they also took ln a nlece whose parents had died tragically. All save one son, who died in an accident in 1937, are still alive and in close contact. (Since this was written Phillip, Constance and Kathy have sadly all died). He saw service with the Royal Artillery in Egypt and Palestine during World War I, but hated every aspect of war and military activity.

A great walker untill well into his 80's when his wife's declining health restricted him to his other great interest, gardening, he regularly walked the three miles into Nottingham, and was often to be seen striding along several miles from his home, taking great breaths of the country air. He maintained a very large garden, surrounded by beautifully clipped hawthorne hedges, in superb condition, being particularly interested in growing roses.

Of slight physique, and reputedly frail as a child, he was a lifelong total abstainer, and non-smoker whilst being tolerant of others, yet maintaining his own good reasons for his (now vindicated) views of the health hazards.

 
 
George in the 1930's

He retired from the Post Office in 1946, and thoroughly enjoyed the ensuing 10 to 15 years, during which he participated to the full in the various activities of his family, helping them with their own home-making, accompanying them on holidays, and entertaining them in his home and garden. He took a particular delight in his grandchildren as they came along and began to grow up.

Starting; with a primitive education, he developed a thirst for knowledge and became a great reader, and through that quite a philosopher. Being possessed of a phenomenal memory and a sharp sense of humour, he was able to carry on fascinating conversations right up to a few weeks before his death, although his eyesight had failed, and he was almost bedridden for the last 3 years.

His wife died in 1971 after being nursed and cared for devotedly throughout some years of declining health.His active life then declined quickly, although he insisted on living on alone in his house. Fortunately his family were able to visit him frequently Illness finally supervened, but he made quite a remarkable recovery from what was believed at the time to be the end, only to have to spend the rest of his days without the physical activity which he had always enjoyed.

All who knew him respected him, and his kindness and complete unselfishness will be remembered by many. Most of his contemporaries have now passed on, and he said many times in the last few years that he wished his life could have come to a close when his main activities had to cease some 10 or 12 years ago, and his lifelong companion was suffering increasing ill-health and senility. He did not so far as is known, come from a long lived family, he had an elder brother who emigrated to. Canada as a young man, to become a Methodist Minister in Saskatchewan, and who was himself still living up until about 12 months ago. Written by his son Philip at the time of his father's death.

 
A Young Edna
 

Mary Edna Picksley known as Edna, like many of her contemporaries, was sent "into service" as a young girl of thirteen. At that tender age she left the small village in Lincolnshire where she was born, and found herself in the city of Nottingham. She worked long hours "below stairs" in return for plain food, a bed and little else. She didn't see her family again for years, but her childhood sweetheart George Keall cycled to Nottingham to see her for the few "hours off' that she was allowed on one day a week. The round trip would be about 120 miles, and of course he could only do this when able to fit it in with his duties as a delivery boy for the local chemist and later a postman in the Lincolnshire village where he lived.

Edna would have found domestic work extremely hard, and as a young recruit would be given all the rough and boring jobs, with none of the mechanical aids which we now take for granted. She was an able student of this domestic discipline, and by the time that George still a postman had transferred to Nottingham, rented a small house and married Edna, she was skilled in all aspects of domesticity. This included making all the children's clothes on her sturdy treadle machine (which is still in working order in Joy's house!). Kathy, along with her brothers and sister, would wear pure white dresses (many beautifully smocked) and petticoats. It was only when the boys started school that their clothing would be differentiated. Edna then made their short-trousered suits and pure white shirts. The girls would wear coloured pinafores over their white dresses.

 
 
Edna with her first baby

It was a very different world in which Edna had to cope as a lone parent whilst George was at war, with a new baby and three other children under the age of six. Wages for the wives of servicemen in those days were a pittance by modern standards, even allowing for the cheapness of everyday necessities relative to today's prices. There was no Health Service, no tree education beyond very basic primary level, no State Pension for retired people, and certainly no Social Services or income support of any kind. Only the wealthy lived in houses with indoor sanitation, and washing machines were a rarity. A typical kitchen would be equipped with a large sink and cold tap, a very basic cooker and little else. And of course there were no disposable nappies or plastic pants!

 
 
The Keall family home at Hills Road, Woodthorpe

Edna was a perfectionist, and her day started at 4 a.m. as had been the case when she was "in service". She used the skills thereby gained to keep her family adequately fed and smartly dressed on a very small income. Babies had to sleep a lot of the time in those days, when long hours of hard work were required to keep a family clean and healthy. It must have been doubly hard when George was away in Egypt fighting "for King and Country". (Thankfully, he was one of those soldiers who did come home.) Edna told me that baby Kathy spent many hours outside in her pram. Edna attached a piece of rope to the pram, which she pulled through the window. She could thus rock the pram whilst getting on with the housework!

The family suffered the sadness of seeing her elder son Philip being permanently disabled by poliomyelitis at the age of eleven. The family worked extremely hard to help Philip come to terms with his disablement. George had to take time off work, which the family could ill afford, to take Philip, clinging to the crossbar of his bicycle on the six mile round trip to the hospital for regular physiotherapy.I

 
George & Edna in later years
 

n 1913, George had managed somehow to save the money to buy two and a half plots of land at what became Hills Road, Woodthorpe. (Land was relatively cheap in those days). For many years George worked the land as a very extensive allotment, growing fruit and vegetables for the family. Edna kept chickens, and developed an expertise in preserving eggs, fruit and vegetables at a time when domestic refrigerators and freezers were unheard of. This extensive self-sufficiency enabled them to save the money to build a house on their land many years later, just in time for the arrival of another baby boy, Clifford Alan, three months before Kathy's fifteenth birthday. The new house had indoor sanitation and a bathroom - also a kitchen with a range with an oven and boiler to supply hot water. A washing machine and electric cooker did not come until later. These refinements were the height of luxury to the family at this time, but the equipment was technologically very primitive by today's standards. Upstairs there were two bedrooms and a box room. Sometime after baby Clifford (Cliffs) first birthday, cousin Mary (Molly) Picksley came to join the family - a young girl who had sadly been orphaned. Kathy, her sister Connie and cousin Molly were very much involved in Cliffs care as a baby and young child. Holidays were spent at Chapel St. Leonards in Lincolnshire. However, a stop was put to these holidays by World War 2, when rolls of barbed wire and other defences rendered the coast out of bounds for recreation.

The overwhelming tragedy for the whole family was when Kathy's brother George was tragically killed in a road accident at the age of twenty-two. ( Written by her son Clifford.)

Children from this marriage were:

     

 

The Picksley Family

Joseph Picksley (1799) and Sarah Watts

Joseph Picksley was born in 1799 in Kirton, Lincolnshire. Joseph married Sarah Watts on the 23 April, 1822 at Willoughton, Lincolnshire . . Sarah was born in 1801 in Willoughton, Lincolnshire

In 1851, Joseph & Sarah were living in Caenby, Lincolnshire and Joseph was a blacksmith. Living with them were children, Ann aged 14, born Spittal, Thomas aged 22, born Normanby and Charles aged 19, a blacksmith apprentice, born Spittal, Lincolnshire

Children from this marriage were:

    • Thomas Picksley was born in 1829 in Normanby, Lincolnshire.
    • Charles Picksley was born in 1830 in Spittal, Lincolnshire. Charles married Frances (b. 1829).
    • Ann Picksley was born in 1837 in Spittal, Lincolnshire.

     

Charles Picksley (1830) & Frances Fieldsend

Charles Picksley was born in 1830 in Spittal, Lincolnshire. Charles married Frances Fieldsend in 1854.. Frances was born in 1829 in Tealby, Lincolnshire., the daughter of William and Olympa Fieldsend. In 1851 they were neighbours in Cainby.

 
St Nicholas Church, Caenby
 

In 1871 George & Frances were living at Blacksmith House in Cainby, Lincolnshire and he was a blacksmith. Living with them were children, Ann aged 17, Joseph aged 12, William aged 11, Mary aged 8, Charles aged 5, Arthur aged 3, James aged 7 and George aged 2.

In 1881 Charles & Frances were still living in Caenby at Blacksmith House, with son Joseph aged 22, a blacksmith, William aged 21, a carpenter, Mary aged 19, James aged 17, a blacksmith, Charles aged 15, Arthur aged 13, George aged 12 and John aged 7 a grandson, born Cainsby.

In 1891 Charles & Frances were still at the same address, with daughter Mary, a letter carrier, son Arthur and grandson John, both agricultural labourers. Living next door was son Charles, wife Lavinia, children Ernest & Hugh. Charles was a gardener.

Charles died in 1896.

 

Children from this marriage were:

    • Joseph Picksley was born in 1859 in Glentham, Lincolnshire.
    • William Picksley was born in 1860 in Glentham, Lincolnshire. William married Clara Massam
    • Ann Picksley was born in 1854 in Glentham, Lincolnshire.
    • Arthur Picksley was born in 1868 in Glentham, Lincolnshire.
    • Charles Picksley was born in 1866 in Glentham, Lincolnshire.
    • George Picksley was born in 1869 in Cainsby, Lincolnshire.
    • James Picksley was born in 1864 in Glentham, Lincolnshire.
    • Mary Picksley was born in 1863 in Glentham, Lincolnshire.

     

William Picksley (1860) & Clara Massam

William Picksley was born in 1860 in Glentham, Lincolnshire and married Clara Massam in 1884 in Lincoln, Lincolnshire. Clara was born in 1868 in Rippingale, Lincolnshire, England.

1891 Census for Nornanby, Lincolnshire showing William, Clara and family

William and Clara married in 1884 and in 1891 were living in Normanby, Lincolnshire. William was a carpenter. Living with them were children, Clara, aged 6, Harry aged 4, William aged 2, Mary E aged 1 and Laura just 2 weeks old. All the children were born in Normanby. In 1901 they were still living in Normanby, with children, Clara aged 16 , a house domestic, William aged 12, a scholar, Edna M aged 11 and Eleanor F aged 7.

Children from this marriage were:

  • Clara C Picksley was born in 1885 in Normanby, Lincolnshire
  • Harry Picksley was born in 1887 in Normanby, Lincolnshire married Elsie. Their child was Mary ( Molly) Picksley
  • William Picksley was born in 1889 in Normanby, Lincolnshire.
  • Mary Edna Picksley was born on 11 Jul 1889 in Normanby, Lincolnshire and died on 13 Sep 1971 in Nottingham, Notts at age 82. Mary married George Keall (b. 13 Jul 1883, d. 27 Mar 1977) on 3 Jun 1911 in St John The Evangelist, Carrington.
  • Laura M Picksley was born in 1891 in Normanby, Lincolnshire.
  • Eleanor F Picksley was born in 1894 in Normanby, Lincolnshire.

 

My thanks to Cliff & Maureen (Keall) who have put so much into this reasearch, providing the biographies and photographs.

 

 

 
  © 2003-6 Sheila Yeo | For more information on the Yeo family and the research contained in this site email sheila@yeosociety.com or call me on +44 (0)1626 360978